The greatest leg-spinner of them all carved out.

A flamboyant lifestyle cast outside the mould of a traditional cricketing icon

Shane Warne mixed legendary cricket deeds with lurid headlines away from the pitch in a career.

Warne, who has died at the age of 52 from a suspected heart attack.

Never one for half-measures throughout his extraordinary 15-year Test cricket career.

Traditional cricketing icon, often putting himself at odds with the game’s purists.

Vainglorious Warne did things his way and will be remembered for his dalliances.

Forthright opinions as much as for his pioneering 708 Test wickets in a 145-Test career that made him the scourge of batsmen worldwide.

Warne is entrenched in Australia’s sporting pantheon in the eyes of many he is second only to cricket’s immortal Don Bradman.

Yet his achievements are tempered for some by his penchant for a zesty private life.

Including at one point being engaged to British actress Liz Hurley.

But Warne’s contribution to cricket is not in doubt, notably after he resurrected the waning art of leg-spin.

Becoming the first bowler to take 700 Test wickets and delivered the most famous ball in the sport’s history.

Ball of the century

Warne posted inauspicious figures of 1-150 in his 1992 Test debut but knuckled down under Terry Jenner.

Eighteen months later, Warne riveted the cricketing world with the “ball of the century” against England.

Warne’s first leg-break delivery in an Ashes Test turned viciously to bamboozle.

England’s Mike Gatting at Old Trafford in 1993 that heralded the arrival of a cricketing superstar.

He was a master of mind games, targeting batsmen ahead of a series and warning.

He was working on a new mystery ball to bowl out his “bunnies” in the opposition line-up.

He gave a man-of-the-match performance when Australia won the World Cup in 1999.

He known for a sharp and inventive cricketing brain which saw him long touted as Australian Test skipper.

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